Thursday, August 21, 2014

SMART BIKE FOR THE WISE TRAVELER

Smart bicycles not only use renewable electricity to climb hills, but they also have cameras to ensure security. They can be folded to facilitate carrying and allow cyclists to find directions using smartphones. Apart from aiding a healthy lifestyle and being a popular means of transportation, smart bicycles can even solve chronic traffic problems. Traffic problems have not been solved by organizing infrastructure solely for the sake of automobiles.
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Autonomous 'Road Trains' Will Usher in the Driverless Future

The Sunday Times reported that the UK is looking to test automated lorry convoys from next year. These are basically groups of lorries that drive in sync with one another, snaking along motorways with just a few yards between their bumpers.
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Google's driverless cars 'will be allowed to speed'

Google’s driverless cars have been given permission to break the speed limit by up to 10mph, admits the head of the project – but not by police

Feds seek input on potential smart car regs

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is seeking input on potential regulations of cars that communicate with each other while they are on the road. 
The so-called smart cars, which utilize what's known in the auto industry as vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, are seen as a potential game changer in reducing the number of car accidents in the U.S. 

Americans Aren’t Sure How to Feel About Driverless Cars

Many are conflicted about this new advancement for the automobile. A new survey from Brandon Schoettle and Michael Sivak at the University of Michigan polled drivers in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia on their opinions about driverless cars.
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3 Big-Time Benefits of Real-Time Transit Data

Working with Kari Watkins of Georgia Tech, who helped develop theOneBusAway appCandace Brakewood of the City College of New York recently studied the effects real-time information had on rider behavior in Tampa (where the app was deployed in summer 2013) and Atlanta (where the full launch came in February 2014). In both places, riders using real-time services experienced shorter wait times and greater trip satisfaction; there were also signs the apps might increase ridership (fitting with previous evidence from Chicago).
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How Will Self-Driving Cars Change Teenage Culture?

Michael Petrilli, an award-winning writer and the president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, an education think tank based in Washington, DC., suggests that we haven't really given much thought to how auto-piloted cars will change the teen (and tween) years—especially since most adolescents are ready for independent mobility long before they are qualified to operate a car.
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Building a driverless future: the next step


Following Google's development of its new driverless "pod" model, other companies like the U.K.-based RDM Group have announced they are working with Transport Systems Catapult and Oxford University's Mobile Robotics Group to develop their own electric-powered pods, which will be part of the TSC's Low Carbon Urban Transport Zone Pathfinder program, Paul Fanning writes. The pods are in the testing phase, but LUTZ says the goal is to bring 100 pavement-based pods to the public by 2017. The pods represent an interim phase of autonomous driving that experts say will help make fully autonomous cars a reality

Pennsylvania STICs to innovation for improved road safety

Since launching in 2011, the STIC has grown by leaps and bounds. Organizers made the smart, early move of engaging and involving key players –state and federal agencies, local governments, research organizations, industry partners, and academics. They also assembled Technical Advisory Groups (TAGs) that pursue a rigorous review of expected benefits before selecting projects and innovations.

Monday, August 18, 2014

Google's driverless car review: The technology easily handles routine driving

Mountain View: The car stopped at stop signs. It glided around curves. It didn't lurch or jolt. The most remarkable thing about the drive was that it was utterly unremarkable.
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